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ResearchMethodolgy_QBank

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Title of test:
ResearchMethodolgy_QBank

Description:
ResearchMethodolgy

Author:
AVATAR

Creation Date:
30/05/2022

Category:
Others

Number of questions: 394
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Q1 You might choose one of these papers and identify how you could attempt to produce similar results. A Making a Strong Start B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start .
Q2 Frequently save the document you are working on. A Making a Strong Start B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start.
Q3 It makes a distinct contribution to knowledge. A Making a Strong Start B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start.
Q4 You need to define your topic more carefully- and put some limits around it. A Making a Strong Start B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start.
Q5 The researcher is supposed to develop a hypothesis- then design a crucial experiment to test it A Classical application of the scientific method B It might be hypothesis generation- musing over the odd and surprising- finding lines of attack on difficult problems C It might be design and execution of crucial experiments- analysis of results in terms of existing theory D All research problem.
Q6 The inspiration in research A Classical application of the scientific method B It might be hypothesis generation- musing over the odd and surprising- finding lines of attack on difficult problems C It might be design and execution of crucial experiments- analysis of results in terms of existing theory D All research problem .
Q7 The rational thinking in research A Classical application of the scientific method B It might be hypothesis generation- musing over the odd and surprising- finding lines of attack on difficult problems C It might be design and execution of crucial experiments- analysis of results in terms of existing theory D All research problem.
Q8 It involves the tension between the creative and the rational parts of our brains. A Classical application of the scientific method B It might be hypothesis generation- musing over the odd and surprising- finding lines of attack on difficult problems C It might be design and execution of crucial experiments- analysis of results in terms of existing theory D All research problem .
Q9 The framework of research methodolgy A It is the mechanics of thesis writing - but the aim throughout is to help students understand how to conceptualize and approach the problems of producing a thesis - as well as to walk through the details of what a thesis should (or shouldn’t) look like. B Receive positive examiners’ reports. C It is an extended argument D What Is a Thesis?.
Q10 Writing a thesis like this is something of a journey. It can be challenging for students and supervisors- but one of the many rewards for both parties is to A It is the mechanics of thesis writing - but the aim throughout is to help students understand how to conceptualize and approach the problems of producing a thesis - as well as to walk through the details of what a thesis should (or shouldn’t) look like. B Receive positive examiners’ reports. C It is an extended argument D What Is a Thesis?.
Q11 What Is a Thesis? A It is the mechanics of thesis writing - but the aim throughout is to help students understand how to conceptualize and approach the problems of producing a thesis - as well as to walk through the details of what a thesis should (or shouldn’t) look like. B Receive positive examiners’ reports. C It is an extended argument D What Is a Thesis?.
Q12 It must demonstrate logical- structured- and defensible reasoning based on credible and verifiable evidence presented in such a way that it makes an original contribution to knowledge- as judged by experts in the field A It is the mechanics of thesis writing - but the aim throughout is to help students understand how to conceptualize and approach the problems of producing a thesis - as well as to walk through the details of what a thesis should (or shouldn’t) look like. B Receive positive examiners’ reports. C It is an extended argument D What Is a Thesis?.
Q13 Each one is different- and there are no standard or generic constructions A Theses are an oddity B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start.
Q14 Backup storage technology for home computers continues to external storage. A Theses are an oddity B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start.
Q15 Its contribution to knowledge rests on originality of approach and/or interpretation of the findings and- in some cases- the discovery of new facts. A Theses are an oddity B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start.
Q16 You might need to know what is the current challenges and problems are A Theses are an oddity B Document and Version Management C The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. D Making a Strong Start .
Q17 The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. A Criteria for Examination and Attributes of a Successful Thesis B An examination. C Whether or not you have demonstrated your fitness to be admitted to a community of scholars. D Does the candidate show sufficient familiarity with- and understanding and critical appraisal of- the relevant literature?.
Q18 The primary purpose in writing a thesis is to pass A Criteria for Examination and Attributes of a Successful Thesis B An examination. C Whether or not you have demonstrated your fitness to be admitted to a community of scholars D Does the candidate show sufficient familiarity with- and understanding and critical appraisal of- the relevant literature? .
Q19 The examiners read your thesis to assess A Criteria for Examination and Attributes of a Successful Thesis B An examination. C Whether or not you have demonstrated your fitness to be admitted to a community of scholars. D Does the candidate show sufficient familiarity with- and understanding and critical appraisal of- the relevant literature?.
Q20 Familiarity with the previous work A Criteria for Examination and Attributes of a Successful Thesis B An examination. C Whether or not you have demonstrated your fitness to be admitted to a community of scholars D Does the candidate show sufficient familiarity with- and understanding and critical appraisal of- the relevant literature?.
Q21 Does the thesis provide a sufficiently comprehensive investigation of the topic? A Familiarity with the previous work B Are the methods and techniques adopted appropriate to the subject matter and are they properly justified and applied? C Are the results suitably set out and accompanied by adequate exposition and interpretation? D Are conclusions and implications appropriately developed and clearly linked to the nature and content of the research framework and findings?.
Q22 Choosing appropriate research methods A Familiarity with the previous work B Are the methods and techniques adopted appropriate to the subject matter and are they properly justified and applied? C Are the results suitably set out and accompanied by adequate exposition and interpretation? D Are conclusions and implications appropriately developed and clearly linked to the nature and content of the research framework and findings?.
Q23 Showing that you know what they mean A Familiarity with the previous work B Are the methods and techniques adopted appropriate to the subject matter and are they properly justified and applied? C Are the results suitably set out and accompanied by adequate exposition and interpretation? D Are conclusions and implications appropriately developed and clearly linked to the nature and content of the research framework and findings?.
Q24 Check the alignment- and connections- between an initial aim and the final conclusions A Familiarity with the previous work B Are the methods and techniques adopted appropriate to the subject matter and are they properly justified and applied? C Are the results suitably set out and accompanied by adequate exposition and interpretation? D Are conclusions and implications appropriately developed and clearly linked to the nature and content of the research framework and findings.
Q25 Able to communicate well within the international research community A Have the research questions in fact been tested? B Is the literary quality and general presentation of the thesis of a suitably high standard? C Does the thesis as a whole constitute a substantive original contribution to knowledge in the subject area with which it deals? D It is a work of original research of approximately 10-000 words in length (It is typically produced within a year alongside the demands of coursework.).
Q26 Quality of the work as a whole A Have the research questions in fact been tested? B Is the literary quality and general presentation of the thesis of a suitably high standard? C Does the thesis as a whole constitute a substantive original contribution to knowledge in the subject area with which it deals? D It is a work of original research of approximately 10-000 words in length (It is typically produced within a year alongside the demands of coursework.).
Q27 Original contribution A Have the research questions in fact been tested? B Is the literary quality and general presentation of the thesis of a suitably high standard? C Does the thesis as a whole constitute a substantive original contribution to knowledge in the subject area with which it deals? D It is a work of original research of approximately 10-000 words in length (It is typically produced within a year alongside the demands of coursework.).
Q28 At Honors level A Have the research questions in fact been tested? B Is the literary quality and general presentation of the thesis of a suitably high standard? C Does the thesis as a whole constitute a substantive original contribution to knowledge in the subject area with which it deals? D It is a work of original research of approximately 10-000 words in length (It is typically produced within a year alongside the demands of coursework.).
Q29 At the Masters degree level - minor thesis A Itis with length limits ranging from 10-000 to 25-000 words. It is completed within one or two years alongside coursework B It is about 30-000 to 40-000 words. It is much more substantial than those that are written by coursework students as it is the result of full-time research over one to two years. This thesis is examined by experts in the field outside the department. C The word limit of a thesis is 1-00-000 words; most students write approximately 80-000 words. In Australia- It is typically produced in 3 years of full-time study. D If you were an examiner. With the guidelines for examiners in front of you- begin the assessment of each of them by first looking at the overall layout.
Q30 At the Masters degree level - Masters by research A Itis with length limits ranging from 10-000 to 25-000 words. It is completed within one or two years alongside coursework B It is about 30-000 to 40-000 words. It is much more substantial than those that are written by coursework students as it is the result of full-time research over one to two years. This thesis is examined by experts in the field outside the department. C The word limit of a thesis is 1-00-000 words; most students write approximately 80-000 words. In Australia- It is typically produced in 3 years of full-time study. D If you were an examiner. With the guidelines for examiners in front of you- begin the assessment of each of them by first looking at the overall layout.
Q31 Doctor of Philosophy level A Itis with length limits ranging from 10-000 to 25-000 words. It is completed within one or two years alongside coursework B It is about 30-000 to 40-000 words. It is much more substantial than those that are written by coursework students as it is the result of full-time research over one to two years. This thesis is examined by experts in the field outside the department. C The word limit of a thesis is 1-00-000 words; most students write approximately 80-000 words. In Australia- It is typically produced in 3 years of full-time study D If you were an examiner. With the guidelines for examiners in front of you- begin the assessment of each of them by first looking at the overall layout.
Q32 Look at Other Theses where A Itis with length limits ranging from 10-000 to 25-000 words. It is completed within one or two years alongside coursework B It is about 30-000 to 40-000 words. It is much more substantial than those that are written by coursework students as it is the result of full-time research over one to two years. This thesis is examined by experts in the field outside the department. C The word limit of a thesis is 1-00-000 words; most students write approximately 80-000 words. In Australia- It is typically produced in 3 years of full-time study. D If you were an examiner. With the guidelines for examiners in front of you- begin the assessment of each of them by first looking at the overall layout.
Q33 The first step of checking Other Theses A If the table of contents gives you a clear idea of the structure of the work as a whole. B Browse the introduction and conclusions- and look through the reference section. C Read the introduction carefully and compare it to the conclusions to see if the work is linked in a coherent manner D Professional layouts- innovative displays of complex material in graphs or tables- or a strong integration of online materials.
Q34 The second step of checking Other Theses A If the table of contents gives you a clear idea of the structure of the work as a whole B Browse the introduction and conclusions- and look through the reference section. C Read the introduction carefully and compare it to the conclusions to see if the work is linked in a coherent manner D Professional layouts- innovative displays of complex material in graphs or tables- or a strong integration of online materials.
Q35 The third step of checking Other Theses A If the table of contents gives you a clear idea of the structure of the work as a whole B Browse the introduction and conclusions- and look through the reference section. C Read the introduction carefully and compare it to the conclusions to see if the work is linked in a coherent manner D Professional layouts- innovative displays of complex material in graphs or tables- or a strong integration of online materials.
Q36 Look especially for specific formatting and conventions A If the table of contents gives you a clear idea of the structure of the work as a whole. B Browse the introduction and conclusions- and look through the reference section C Read the introduction carefully and compare it to the conclusions to see if the work is linked in a coherent manner D Professional layouts- innovative displays of complex material in graphs or tables- or a strong integration of online materials. .
Q37 Examinations are not necessarily to hand out criticism- or even praise- but A To sharpen a study B It is to document your processes and the outcome of your work comprehensible to readers C that you take the reader from the aim to the conclusions- via the evidence and arguments- in the clearest possible way. D The Standard Thesis Structure.
Q38 It is not to explain how you spent your time- or to describe the hypotheses that ultimately didn’t make sense - but A To sharpen a study B It is to document your processes and the outcome of your work comprehensible to readers C that you take the reader from the aim to the conclusions- via the evidence and arguments- in the clearest possible way. D The Standard Thesis Structure.
Q39 You need to structure your thesis in such a way A To sharpen a study B It is to document your processes and the outcome of your work comprehensible to readers C that you take the reader from the aim to the conclusions- via the evidence and arguments- in the clearest possible way. D The Standard Thesis Structure .
Q40 Introduction - Background - Core- and a synthesis A To sharpen a study B It is to document your processes and the outcome of your work comprehensible to readers C that you take the reader from the aim to the conclusions- via the evidence and arguments- in the clearest possible way D The Standard Thesis Structure.
Q41 IT explains what the thesis is about: The problem that the thesis is concerned with- the aims and scope- and the thesis structure. In some disciplines it includes an overview of the findings. It may use illustrative examples to help underpin the reader’s understanding of what you are trying to achieve. (Tell the reader the problem you are tackling in this project) A The introduction B The background C The core D The synthesis.
Q42 It is the knowledge required before a reader can understand your research: relevant history- context- current knowledge- theory and practice- and other researchers’ views. (How it affects the questions you can ask) A The introduction B The background C The core D The synthesis .
Q43 It concerns your own work: Your propositions or hypothesesinnovations- experimental designs- surveys and reviews- resultsanalysis- and so on. The core can easily form the bulk of the thesis and consist of several chapters. (Contribution - test your hypotheses or answer your questions- and why you chose them) A The introduction B The background C The core D The synthesis.
Q44 It draws together your contribution to the topic. It will usually contain a discussion in which you critically examine your own results in the light of the previous state of the subject as outlined in the background- and make judgments as to what has been learnt in your work; the discussion may be a separate chapter- or may be integrated with the detailed work in the core. (Pull the whole thesis together) A The introduction B The background C The core D The synthesis.
Q45 It that takes the reader along the road should be as straightforward as you can make it A The story- or narrative B the structure might be C Don’t make the mistake of trying to reinvent the form of the thesis from scratch D In-depth examination of the context and history of a situation before arriving at a statement of the problem. .
Q46 The problem and its significance; relationship to previous work; derivation of hypotheses; design of experiments; results; analysis and interpretations; conclusions A The story- or narrative B the structure might be C Don’t make the mistake of trying to reinvent the form of the thesis from scratch D In-depth examination of the context and history of a situation before arriving at a statement of the problem. .
Q47 Non-standard Thesis Structures - interdisciplinary A The story- or narrative B the structure might be C Don’t make the mistake of trying to reinvent the form of the thesis from scratch D In-depth examination of the context and history of a situation before arriving at a statement of the problem.
Q48 Non-standard Thesis Structures - Blending A The story- or narrative B the structure might be C Don’t make the mistake of trying to reinvent the form of the thesis from scratch D In-depth examination of the context and history of a situation before arriving at a statement of the problem. .
Q49 Maintainin consistency of style and presentation over 50-000 words or more. It a problem where and when A Writing at a Computer B Entering and modifying text; spelling and grammar checkers; a bibliography database; a line-art environment; and a system for laying out the text in a form suitable for printing or for viewing online. C It is particularly important thate a word processor allows D Presentation .
Q50 Some tools might include an editor for A Writing at a Computer B Entering and modifying text; spelling and grammar checkers; a bibliography database; a line-art environment; and a system for laying out the text in a form suitable for printing or for viewing online. C It is particularly important thate a word processor allows D Presentation .
Q51 The style of a document to be separated from its content A Writing at a Computer B Entering and modifying text; spelling and grammar checkers; a bibliography database; a line-art environment; and a system for laying out the text in a form suitable for printing or for viewing online C It is particularly important thate a word processor allows D Presentation.
Q52 It is one way that examiners assess your readiness to enter the community of scholars. If you are sloppy- or maintain incomplete lists- or perhaps fail to cite a work- it signals that are you not respecting colleagues A Writing at a Computer B Entering and modifying text; spelling and grammar checkers; a bibliography database; a line-art environment; and a system for laying out the text in a form suitable for printing or for viewing online. C It is particularly important thate a word processor allows D Presentation.
Q53 You shouldn’t put references in your list of references A Unless you have cited them B Is to have paragraphs with numbers like 3.1.2.1a C It is names (people’s names or place names)- and words for which there are alternative spellings. D It alternative spellings are permissible ( -or or -our and -ize or -ise are the most common).
Q54 Avoiding deep structures A Unless you have cited them B Is to have paragraphs with numbers like 3.1.2.1a C It is names (people’s names or place names)- and words for which there are alternative spellings. D It alternative spellings are permissible ( -or or -our and -ize or -ise are the most common).
Q55 Writing Tools - First problems is A Unless you have cited them B Is to have paragraphs with numbers like 3.1.2.1a C It is names (people’s names or place names)- and words for which there are alternative spellings. D It alternative spellings are permissible ( -or or -our and -ize or -ise are the most common).
Q56 Writing Tools - second problems is A Unless you have cited them B Is to have paragraphs with numbers like 3.1.2.1a C It is names (people’s names or place names)- and words for which there are alternative spellings. D It alternative spellings are permissible ( -or or -our and -ize or -ise are the most common). .
Q57 Writing Tools - third problems is A Grammar-checkers (plural subjects must not have singular verbs). B The title of the article- the journal name- year of publication- and publisher and place- together with an optional abstract and keywords. C Tables and Figures D Tracking Changes.
Q58 The standard References (Harvard style) must have A Grammar-checkers (plural subjects must not have singular verbs). B The title of the article- the journal name- year of publication- and publisher and place- together with an optional abstract and keywords. C Tables and Figures D Tracking Changes .
Q59 If you are using charts generated by a spreadsheet program or a statistical package- these too can be imported into your text. If you want to plot your data- enter into such a package rather than attempting to create a graph with a line art tool A Grammar-checkers (plural subjects must not have singular verbs). B The title of the article- the journal name- year of publication- and publisher and place- together with an optional abstract and keywords. C Tables and Figures D Tracking Changes .
Q60 See what you have done- and later decide whether to accept or reject your decisions A Grammar-checkers (plural subjects must not have singular verbs). B The title of the article- the journal name- year of publication- and publisher and place- together with an optional abstract and keywords. C Tables and Figures D Tracking Changes .
Q61 That is- explicit storage of drafts and tracking changes as the work progresses A Version management B Writing Style C When people criticize your writing- don’t be defensive D Carpet-bag sentences. .
Q62 Do not see that no benefit in writing well A Version management B Writing Style C When people criticize your writing- don’t be defensive D Carpet-bag sentences. .
Q63 Writing Style A Version management B Writing Style C When people criticize your writing- don’t be defensive D Carpet-bag sentences. .
Q64 If you can cut a sentence into parts without destroying the meaning or tone- do so. A Version management B Writing Style C When people criticize your writing- don’t be defensive D Carpet-bag sentences.
Q65 Thesis and Things to avoid A Don not use homespun phrasing- and folksy metaphors B Use of the First Person C Verb Tenses D Reporting what you or others did at particular .
Q66 To remove the presence of the writer from the text- scientists resorted to use of the passive voice A Don not use homespun phrasing- and folksy metaphors B Use of the First Person C Verb Tenses D Reporting what you or others did at particular .
Q67 Rely on the context to indicate whether something happened in the past- is happening now- or may happen in the future. A Don not use homespun phrasing- and folksy metaphors B Use of the First Person C Verb Tenses D Reporting what you or others did at particular.
Q68 Use the past tense when you are A Don not use homespun phrasing- and folksy metaphors B Use of the First Person C Verb Tenses D Reporting what you or others did at particular .
Q69 When you are in an introduction to a chapter or section or a table where you are outlining its contents A Use the present tense B discussing the implications of some work of yours or others C Reporting the implications of your or other work D Punctuation - Commas .
Q70 Use the present tense when you are A Use the present tense B discussing the implications of some work of yours or others C Reporting the implications of your or other work D Punctuation - Commas.
Q71 Use the future tense when A Use the present tense B discussing the implications of some work of yours or others C Reporting the implications of your or other work D Punctuation - Commas .
Q72 They should be used after transitional words such as howevernevertheless- moreover- therefore- and similarly. A Use the present tense B discussing the implications of some work of yours or others C Reporting the implications of your or other work D Punctuation - Commas .
Q73 The main use is to separate parts of a sentence that are too closely related to be broken into separate sentences. A Punctuation - Semicolons B Punctuation -Colons C Punctuation -Dashes and hyphens D Punctuation -Exclamations .
Q74 The have a sense of introducing something that is to follow: a list A Punctuation - Semicolons B Punctuation -Colons C Punctuation -Dashes and hyphens D Punctuation -Exclamations.
Q75 They are different- and each has its own specific uses. one is used to build up complex words. A Punctuation - Semicolons B Punctuation -Colons C Punctuation -Dashes and hyphens D Punctuation -Exclamations.
Q76 Avoid them! They are annoying A Punctuation - Semicolons B Punctuation -Colons C Punctuation -Dashes and hyphens D Punctuation -Exclamations .
Q77 If the meaning is still clear with a lowercase initial (and the word isn’t a proper noun). A Punctuation -Capitalization B Punctuation - Brackets Curved brackets (parentheses)- and square brackets C Punctuation -Quotations D Link words.
Q78 Have quite separate uses - Don’t use them nterchangeably A Punctuation -Capitalization B Punctuation - Brackets Curved brackets (parentheses)- and square brackets C Punctuation -Quotations D Link words .
Q79 It is to enclose the exact words of a writer or speaker A Punctuation -Capitalization B Punctuation - Brackets Curved brackets (parentheses)- and square brackets C Punctuation -Quotations D Link words .
Q80 Is to indicate the logic flow in a passage of text (conjunctionstransitional ) A Punctuation -Capitalization B Punctuation - Brackets Curved brackets (parentheses)- and square brackets C Punctuation -Quotations D Link words.
Q81 They will be condemned for using jargon. A Repeated words B Repair words C Appendices D Plagiarism.
Q82 as regards- in regard to’- in terms of - in relation -rather than A Repeated words B Repair words C Appendices D Plagiarism .
Q83 They might establish the context of an item in the main text- or give the derivation of an equation. A Repeated words B Repair words C Appendices D Plagiarism .
Q84 It is a fundamental issue of academic honesty and instances of it can provoke strong responses. A Repeated words B Repair words C Appendices D Plagiarism .
Q85 Draftthesis structure with chapters- sections- and subsections. Whenever something occurred - add a new section and a few lines of text to describe what you thought you should say. A Creating a Structure B Research first and write later C Research and write together D Starting- and Starting Again & Writing an Individual Chapter.
Q86 it is a weak model because it brings two risks. One is that the writing is likely to be less Polished A Creating a Structure B Research first and write later C Research and write together D Starting- and Starting Again & Writing an Individual Chapter.
Q87 It is a model that enabled you to resolve the tension between your rational- conscious thinking and creative- unconscious thinking. A Creating a Structure B Research first and write later C Research and write together D Starting- and Starting Again & Writing an Individual Chapter.
Q88 Is you good enough to finish a thesis if you couldn’t start! A Creating a Structure B Research first and write later C Research and write together D Starting- and Starting Again & Writing an Individual Chapter .
Q89 I asked you to list the key areas you are interested in. Within a few minutes- you have to list five topic areas. A Next- I’ll ask you to circle the ones that you is particularly interested in. B Allow the creative side of your brain to work C Type another- and then maybe delete the whole sentence and begin again. D It is a paper or book or other source you discover through actively exploring Gateways lead to paths. .
Q90 When you have finished writing for the day- save what you have written. Then go to bed- and sleep on it A Next- I’ll ask you to circle the ones that you is particularly interested in. B Allow the creative side of your brain to work C Type another- and then maybe delete the whole sentence and begin again. D It is a paper or book or other source you discover through actively exploring Gateways lead to paths. .
Q91 You would sit at your desk and type a single word- stare at it for a while- then A Next- I’ll ask you to circle the ones that you is particularly interested in. B Allow the creative side of your brain to work C Type another- and then maybe delete the whole sentence and begin again. D It is a paper or book or other source you discover through actively exploring Gateways lead to paths.
Q92 The recommend strategy is to find the gateways A Next- I’ll ask you to circle the ones that you is particularly interested in. B Allow the creative side of your brain to work C Type another- and then maybe delete the whole sentence and begin again. D It is a paper or book or other source you discover through actively exploring Gateways lead to paths. .
Q93 The recommend strategy is to find the paths A Each paper has a list of citations - each paper may also be cited by others - and online resources can help you find these works too. B They must be Tbalanced C Supervisors D Where are you from - How did you get here - What are you doing here - What type of person are you - What have you done so far - and where are you going .
Q94 Respecting a supervisor and thinking independently. A Each paper has a list of citations - each paper may also be cited by others - and online resources can help you find these works too B They must be Tbalanced C Supervisors D Where are you from - How did you get here - What are you doing here - What type of person are you - What have you done so far - and where are you going .
Q95 The have stories of bull-headed students A Each paper has a list of citations - each paper may also be cited by others - and online resources can help you find these works too. B They must be Tbalanced C Supervisors D Where are you from - How did you get here - What are you doing here - What type of person are you - What have you done so far - and where are you going.
Q96 The Introductory Chapter MUST answer some uestion Like A Each paper has a list of citations - each paper may also be cited by others - and online resources can help you find these works too. B They must be Tbalanced C Supervisors D Where are you from - How did you get here - What are you doing here - What type of person are you - What have you done so far - and where are you going .
Q97 They are crucial- and it speaks for you as you strive to join an international community of scholars. A Introductions B Establishing a Context C The style of discipline area. D It is simple: go to several top journals in your field and note the way that their contributors write. Imitate them.
Q98 For Example- your readers may feel as if they have entered a conversation that has already started without them. A Introductions B Establishing a Context C The style of discipline area. D It is simple: go to several top journals in your field and note the way that their contributors write. Imitate them.
Q99 The style of writing reflects A Introductions B Establishing a Context C The style of discipline area. D It is simple: go to several top journals in your field and note the way that their contributors write. Imitate them. .
Q100 The best way to determine an appropriate style A Introductions B Establishing a Context C The style of discipline area. D It is simple: go to several top journals in your field and note the way that their contributors write. Imitate them. .
Q101 If you’ve situated your work- your next task is to motivate further interest in the area—typically by A Stating the problem B Statement of the Problem or Motivation for the Study generally contains C It may advance knowledge in the applicable field D It may contribute to the solution of a practical problem faced by many others in the field .
Q102 A brief history of the issue at hand - A recent increase of the issue - Dissatisfaction with current knowledge - An identification of specific set of factors. A Stating the problem B Statement of the Problem or Motivation for the Study generally contains C It may advance knowledge in the applicable field D It may contribute to the solution of a practical problem faced by many others in the field .
Q103 The first line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study A Stating the problem B Statement of the Problem or Motivation for the Study generally contains C It may advance knowledge in the applicable field D It may contribute to the solution of a practical problem faced by many others in the field .
Q104 The second line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study A Stating the problem B Statement of the Problem or Motivation for the Study generally contains C It may advance knowledge in the applicable field D It may contribute to the solution of a practical problem faced by many others in the field.
Q105 The third line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study A It may demonstrate a novel use of a procedure or technique B it may advance knowledge in the applicable field C First chapter D The Background Chapter.
Q106 The fourth line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study A It may demonstrate a novel use of a procedure or technique B it may advance knowledge in the applicable field C First chapter D The Background Chapter.
Q107 You have to make a general statement of the research questions or a hypothesis in A It may demonstrate a novel use of a procedure or technique B it may advance knowledge in the applicable field C First chapter D The Background Chapter.
Q108 It would provide the basis for the design of your own work- which then could be understood in context- located within a theoretical framework- and conducted using techniques backed with solid justification A It may demonstrate a novel use of a procedure or technique B it may advance knowledge in the applicable field C First chapter D The Background Chapter .
Q109 The first common elements in the background chapters is A Establishment of a context to locate a study in time- location- or culture. B Identification of current theory- discoveries- and debates- including an evaluation of those most useful and salient to your topic C Understanding of current practices and technologies in your field that highlight. D Preliminary investigations done by you or others to help clarify research techniques- formulate hypotheses.
Q110 The second common elements in the background chapters is A Establishment of a context to locate a study in time- location- or culture. B Identification of current theory- discoveries- and debates- including an evaluation of those most useful and salient to your topic C Understanding of current practices and technologies in your field that highlight D Preliminary investigations done by you or others to help clarify research techniques- formulate hypotheses .
Q111 The third common elements in the background chapters is A Establishment of a context to locate a study in time- location- or culture. B Identification of current theory- discoveries- and debates- including an evaluation of those most useful and salient to your topic C Understanding of current practices and technologies in your field that highlight. D Preliminary investigations done by you or others to help clarify research techniques- formulate hypotheses.
Q112 The fourth common elements in the background chapters is A Establishment of a context to locate a study in time- location- or culture. B Identification of current theory- discoveries- and debates- including an evaluation of those most useful and salient to your topic C Understanding of current practices and technologies in your field that highlight. D Preliminary investigations done by you or others to help clarify research techniques- formulate hypotheses .
Q113 The first purpose of review of current theory serve in A Giving the background information required to contextualize the extent and significance of your research problem. B Identifing and discusses attempts by others to solve similar problems. C Providing examples of methods they have employed in attempts to get these solutions. D I try to get a sense of what the researchers were trying to do and whether the problem is genuinely interesting .
Q114 The second purpose of review of current theory serve in A Giving the background information required to contextualize the extent and significance of your research problem. B Identifing and discusses attempts by others to solve similar problems C Providing examples of methods they have employed in attempts to get these solutions. D I try to get a sense of what the researchers were trying to do and whether the problem is genuinely interesting .
Q115 The third purpose of review of current theory serve in A Giving the background information required to contextualize the extent and significance of your research problem. B Identifing and discusses attempts by others to solve similar problems. C Providing examples of methods they have employed in attempts to get these solutions. D I try to get a sense of what the researchers were trying to do and whether the problem is genuinely interesting .
Q116 For me- The first phase of reading a piece of research literature is. A Giving the background information required to contextualize the extent and significance of your research problem. B Identifing and discusses attempts by others to solve similar problems. C Providing examples of methods they have employed in attempts to get these solutions. D I try to get a sense of what the researchers were trying to do and whether the problem is genuinely interesting.
Q117 For me- The second phase of reading a piece of research literature is. A I try to understand how they undertook the work B I try to look at issues such as whether the results really support the conclusions and whether the experiments look robust. C Don’t include material that the reader does not need in order to understand what will follow. D Include anything that is genuinely clarifying. .
Q118 For me- The third phase of reading a piece of research literature is. A I try to understand how they undertook the work. B I try to look at issues such as whether the results really support the conclusions and whether the experiments look robust. C Don’t include material that the reader does not need in order to understand what will follow. D Include anything that is genuinely clarifying. .
Q119 You have to determine what to omit- and what to establish in your context A I try to understand how they undertook the work. B I try to look at issues such as whether the results really support the conclusions and whether the experiments look robust. C Don’t include material that the reader does not need in order to understand what will follow D Include anything that is genuinely clarifying. .
Q120 You have to determine what to omit- and what to establish in your context A I try to understand how they undertook the work. B I try to look at issues such as whether the results really support the conclusions and whether the experiments look robust. C Don’t include material that the reader does not need in order to understand what will follow. D Include anything that is genuinely clarifying.
Q121 It requires a certain amount of mental gymnastics A Defensive writing B Engaging in a conversation with other academics C Examining the approaches and techniques others used in research in your topic area. D Revising .
Q122 The second section of your review A Defensive writing B Engaging in a conversation with other academics C Examining the approaches and techniques others used in research in your topic area. D Revising .
Q123 The third section of background material A Defensive writing B Engaging in a conversation with other academics C Examining the approaches and techniques others used in research in your topic area. D Revising .
Q124 When you have finished your own research it is time to rewrite the background chapters A Defensive writing B Engaging in a conversation with other academics C Examining the approaches and techniques others used in research in your topic area. D Revising.
Q125 You . . . . who went before you. A Understand the links between your own work and the work of others B Assumptions you made C Surrounding the application of current methods D Feedback from your supervisors and participants .
Q126 You now know what . . . . . - perhaps unconsciously- about your study area. These can now be made explicit. A Understand the links between your own work and the work of others B Assumptions you made C Surrounding the application of current methods D Feedback from your supervisors and participants.
Q127 You are aware of the issues . . . . . in your field- and have explicitly pointed out their limitations. A Understand the links between your own work and the work of others B Assumptions you made C Surrounding the application of current methods D Feedback from your supervisors and participants.
Q128 You may have realized (perhaps with the help of . . . . in your research seminars) that you were making unwarranted assumptions about the level of knowledge of other people about the backgroundto your own work. A Understand the links between your own work and the work of others B Assumptions you made C Surrounding the application of current methods D Feedback from your supervisors and participants.
Q129 Ensure that the ways that you are going to use . . . . are carefully defined. A Words and ideas B Contribution C Suggested Contributions - code refactoring D Suggested templates.
Q130 It is as a convenient label to cover a wide variety of alternative kinds of structure and content; and also that- in some respects- the whole thesis is a it- from your novel analysis of the background literature to your approach to interpretation of results A Words and ideas B Contribution C Suggested Contributions - code refactoring D Suggested templates .
Q131 It is the process of restructuring existing computer code—changing the factoring without changing its external behavior. A Words and ideas B Contribution C Suggested Contributions - code refactoring D Suggested templates .
Q132 Design . . . for . . . A Words and ideas B Contribution C Suggested Contributions - code refactoring D Suggested templates.
Q133 Eexplicit representation of data and control dependencies in . . . field (PipeGraph by Tarek Aly) A Program Dependence Graph: B System Dependence Graph C Software intelligence D Encapsulate . . . field .
Q134 Representation of procedure calls between . . . (PipeGraph by Tarek Aly) A Program Dependence Graph: B System Dependence Graph C Software intelligence D Encapsulate . . . field .
Q135 Reverse engineers the initial state to understand existing . . . application dependencies A Program Dependence Graph: B System Dependence Graph C Software intelligence D Encapsulate . . . field .
Q136 A Forcing code to access the field with getter and setter methods A Program Dependence Graph: B System Dependence Graph C Software intelligence D Encapsulate . . . field .
Q137 Creating more general types to allow for more code sharing for xxxxx A Generalize . . . type B Kinds of Contribution - Observation C Kinds of Contribution - Innovation D Kinds of Contribution - Study .
Q138 It is the action or process of carefully watching someone or something. A Generalize . . . type B Kinds of Contribution - Observation C Kinds of Contribution - Innovation D Kinds of Contribution - Study .
Q139 It is a new thing or a new method of doing something. A Generalize . . . type B Kinds of Contribution - Observation C Kinds of Contribution - Innovation D Kinds of Contribution - Study.
Q140 It is to spend time learning about a particular subject A Generalize . . . type B Kinds of Contribution - Observation C Kinds of Contribution - Innovation D Kinds of Contribution - Study.
Q141 It is a written account that gives detailed information about a person- group- or thing and their development over a period of time. A Kinds of Contribution - Case study B Kinds of Contribution - Theoretical study or explanation C Kinds of Contribution - Practical D Kinds of Contribution - Mathematical .
Q142 It is based on or uses the ideas and abstract principles that relate to a particular subject- rather than the practical aspects or uses of it. A Kinds of Contribution - Case study B Kinds of Contribution - Theoretical study or explanation C Kinds of Contribution - Practical D Kinds of Contribution - Mathematical .
Q143 It is aspects of something involve real situations and events- rather than just ideas and theories. A Kinds of Contribution - Case study B Kinds of Contribution - Theoretical study or explanation C Kinds of Contribution - Practical D Kinds of Contribution - Mathematical .
Q144 It involves numbers and calculations. A Kinds of Contribution - Case study B Kinds of Contribution - Theoretical study or explanation C Kinds of Contribution - Practical D Kinds of Contribution - Mathematical .
Q145 It is a study relies on practical experience rather than theories. A Kinds of Contribution - Empirical B Kinds of Contribution - Principled C Kinds of Contribution - Pragmatic D It is based on observation.
Q146 It is you approved because it has strong moral principles (Philosophical). A Kinds of Contribution - Empirical B Kinds of Contribution - Principled C Kinds of Contribution - Pragmatic D It is based on observation .
Q147 It is a way of dealing with something is based on practical considerations- rather than theoretical ones. A pragmatic person deals with things in a practical way A Kinds of Contribution - Empirical B Kinds of Contribution - Principled C Kinds of Contribution - Pragmatic D It is based on observation.
Q148 They propose a description of observed phenomena and then proceed to evaluate whether the description is valid. A Kinds of Contribution - Empirical B Kinds of Contribution - Principled C Kinds of Contribution - Pragmatic D It is based on observation .
Q149 They involve creation of something new as well as evaluation of it. A It is based on innovation B case study C Methods D Methodology.
Q150 A particular phenomenon can be studied in its own right or to provide information on a broad range of similar phenomena A It is based on innovation B case study C Methods D Methodology.
Q151 They are ways of testing hypotheses or answering questions or evaluating innovations. A It is based on innovation B case study C Methods D Methodology.
Q152 It is the branch of knowledge that deals with method and its application in a particular field of study. A It is based on innovation B case study C Methods D Methodology.
Q153 The term is derived by analogy from surveying- where precise measurement of something involves observing it from multiple angles or locations- and also ensuring that the measurements are consistent with each other A Triangulation B Research Methods C That -this is what I am doing - and - this is how I am going to investigate it D For an observation-based thesis.
Q154 It concerned with the practice of research- or- in the terms of developing the research questions and hypotheses and designing experiments- instruments- and processes for testing these hypotheses. A Triangulation B Research Methods C That -this is what I am doing - and - this is how I am going to investigate it D For an observation-based thesis.
Q155 Research Methods A Triangulation B Research Methods C That -this is what I am doing - and - this is how I am going to investigate it D For an observation-based thesis.
Q156 This may flow directly from the background material A Triangulation B Research Methods C That -this is what I am doing - and - this is how I am going to investigate it D For an observation-based thesis.
Q157 This may involve- say- your building a case that your new approach solves problems that previous approaches neglected. A For an innovation-based thesis B For a study-based thesis C For a case study-base thesis D Making a Strong Start.
Q158 This may persuade the reader that the subject is of sufficient interest A For an innovation-based thesis B For a study-based thesis C For a case study-base thesis D Making a Strong Start.
Q159 This may persuade the reader that the subject is representative of a broader population. A For an innovation-based thesis B For a study-based thesis C For a case study-base thesis D Making a Strong Start.
Q160 Identify the processes that enabled you to reach these insights A For an innovation-based thesis B For a study-based thesis C For a case study-base thesis D Making a Strong Start.
Q161 Print out your thesis every now and again A Document and Version Management B The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. C How the data was gathered and what it is intended to represent D What the gathered data looks like;.
Q162 It demonstrates an ability to communicate research findings effectively in the professional arena and in an international context. A Document and Version Management B The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. C How the data was gathered and what it is intended to represent D What the gathered data looks like;.
Q163 The first component of a thesis that can be viewed is A Document and Version Management B The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. C How the data was gathered and what it is intended to represent D What the gathered data looks like;.
Q164 The second component of a thesis that can be viewed is A Document and Version Management B The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. C How the data was gathered and what it is intended to represent D What the gathered data looks like;.
Q165 The third component of a thesis that can be viewed is A How it should be interpreted. B Outcomes and Results C Fair D The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields.
Q166 At this stage of the research- you will have analyzed and interpreted your results- and now you need to use them to present an argument to the reader. A How it should be interpreted. B Outcomes and Results C Fair D The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields.
Q167 An examiner won’t trust your results unless they understand that your data is A How it should be interpreted. B Outcomes and Results . C Fair D The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields.
Q168 Make an effort- too- to understand the process of submission (guidelines for the examiners) and examination. A How it should be interpreted. B Outcomes and Results C Fair D The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields.
Q169 You need to get into the habit of thinking and working (Your chosen field). A Making a Strong Start B It has a thorough grasp of the appropriate methodological techniques and an awareness of their limitations. C Linking the data to your original goal D Completing a transformation from data to knowledge.
Q170 The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. A Making a Strong Start B It has a thorough grasp of the appropriate methodological techniques and an awareness of their limitations. C Linking the data to your original goal D Completing a transformation from data to knowledge.
Q171 From Data to Results A Making a Strong Start B It has a thorough grasp of the appropriate methodological techniques and an awareness of their limitations. C Linking the data to your original goal D Completing a transformation from data to knowledge.
Q172 Interpretation of the analyses is A Making a Strong Start B It has a thorough grasp of the appropriate methodological techniques and an awareness of their limitations. C Linking the data to your original goal D Completing a transformation from data to knowledge.
Q173 No piece of research is really . . . . and the reader will appreciate your views on where the work could be extended. A Complete B experiment C Difficulties D Which are variables (or parameters) and category.
Q174 Some were always keen to move on to the next . . . before the current one was complete A Complete B experiment C Difficulties D Which are variables (or parameters) and category.
Q175 They might be a straightforward case of carelessness- haste- and overconfidence—and a lack of willingness to listen to criticism—leading A Complete B experiment C Difficulties D Which are variables (or parameters) and category.
Q176 Two key concepts in every aspect of managing data and presenting results A Complete B experiment C Difficulties D Which are variables (or parameters) and category.
Q177 Variables determine the behaviour of the A Data B Document and Version Management C Data becomes information D Information becomes knowledge.
Q178 Make sure you have a single location- maybe that USB drive A Data B Document and Version Management C Data becomes information D Information becomes knowledge.
Q179 When you use it to test hypothesis A Data B Document and Version Management C Data becomes information D Information becomes knowledge.
Q180 When you use an the argument or chain of reasoning to draw conclusions from it A Data B Document and Version Management C Data becomes information D Information becomes knowledge.
Q181 When it is integrated into your whole way of looking at things. A Knowledge becomes wisdom B Theories C Hypothesises D Document and Version Management.
Q182 They are the outcomes of research. They represent our most certain comprehension of the universe A Knowledge becomes wisdom B Theories C Hypothesises D Document and Version Management.
Q183 They are unconfirmed supposition. A Knowledge becomes wisdom B Theories C Hypothesises D Document and Version Management.
Q184 Use logical names for the thesis components. A Knowledge becomes wisdom B Theories C Hypothesises D Document and Version Management.
Q185 Proportion TP / (FP + TP) A Precision Score B Recall Score C Model accuracy D Model F1 score.
Q186 Sensitivity or the true positive rate Recall Score = TP / (FN + TP) A Precision Score B Recall Score C Model accuracy D Model F1 score.
Q187 Ratio Accuracy Score (TP + TN)/ (TP + FN + TN + FP) A Precision Score B Recall Score C Model accuracy D Model F1 score.
Q188 Equal weight function to both the Precision and recall 2* Precision Score * Recall Score/ (Precision Score + Recall Score) A Precision Score B Recall Score C Model accuracy D Model F1 score.
Q189 It is representing predictions vs Actuals on Test Data A Confusion Matrix B True Positive (TP) C False Positive (FP) D Document and Version Management.
Q190 It measures the extent to which the model correctly predicts the positive class. A Confusion Matrix B True Positive (TP) C False Positive (FP) D Document and Version Management.
Q191 It occurs when the model predicts that an instance belongs to a class that it actually does not. A Confusion Matrix B True Positive (TP) C False Positive (FP) D Document and Version Management.
Q192 Create whole directories with complete versions of the thesis. A Confusion Matrix B True Positive (TP) C False Positive (FP) D Document and Version Management.
Q193 It is the outcomes that the model correctly predicts as negative. A True Negative (TN) B False Negative (FN) C True Positive (TP) Example D False Positive (FP) Example.
Q194 It occurs when a model predicts an instance as negative when it is actually positive. A True Negative (TN) B False Negative (FN) C True Positive (TP) Example D False Positive (FP) Example.
Q195 In a binary classification problem with classes -A- and -B-- if our goal is to predict class -A- correctly- then a true positive would be the number of instances of class -A- that our model correctly predicted as class -A-. A True Negative (TN) B False Negative (FN) C True Positive (TP) Example D False Positive (FP) Example.
Q196 If a medical diagnosis model has a high false positive rate- it may result in patients undergoing unnecessary treatment. A True Negative (TN) B False Negative (FN) C True Positive (TP) Example D False Positive (FP) Example.
Q196 You might choose one of these papers and identify how you could attempt to produce similar results. Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q197 Frequently save the document you are working on. Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q198 It makes a distinct contribution to knowledge. Means That Document and Version Management T F.
Q199 You need to define your topic more carefully- and put some limits around it. Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q200 The researcher is supposed to develop a hypothesis- then design a crucial experiment to test it Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q201 The inspiration in research Means That It might be hypothesis generation- musing over the odd and surprising- finding lines of attack on difficult problems T F.
Q202 The rational thinking in research Means That It might be hypothesis generation- musing over the odd and surprising- finding lines of attack on difficult problems T F.
Q203 It involves the tension between the creative and the rational parts of our brains. Means That It might be design and execution of crucial experiments- analysis of results in terms of existing theory T F.
Q204 The framework of research methodolgy Means That All research problem T F.
Q205 Writing a thesis like this is something of a journey. It can be challenging for students and supervisors- but one of the many rewards for both parties is to Means That Receive positive examiners’ reports. T F.
Q206 What Is a Thesis? Means That Receive positive examiners’ reports. T F.
Q207 It must demonstrate logical- structured- and defensible reasoning based on credible and verifiable evidence presented in such a way that it makes an original contribution to knowledge- as judged by experts in the field. Means That What Is a Thesis? T F.
Q208 Each one is different- and there are no standard or generic constructions. Means That What Is a Thesis? T F.
Q209 Backup storage technology for home computers continues to external storage. Means That Document and Version Management T F.
Q210 Its contribution to knowledge rests on originality of approach and/or interpretation of the findings and- in some cases- the discovery of new facts. Means That Document and Version Management T F.
Q211 You might need to know what is the current challenges and problems are. Means That The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. T F.
Q212 The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. Means That Criteria for Examination and Attributes of a Successful Thesis T F.
Q213 The primary purpose in writing a thesis is to pass Means That An examination. T F.
Q214 The examiners read your thesis to assess Means That Whether or not you have demonstrated your fitness to be admitted to a community of scholars. T F.
Q215 Familiarity with the previous work Means That Whether or not you have demonstrated your fitness to be admitted to a community of scholars. T F.
Q216 Does the thesis provide a sufficiently comprehensive investigation of the topic? Means That Familiarity with the previous work T F.
Q217 Choosing appropriate research methods Means That Familiarity with the previous work T F.
Q218 Showing that you know what they mean Means That Are the results suitably set out and accompanied by adequate exposition and interpretation? T F.
Q219 Check the alignment- and connections- between an initial aim and the final conclusions Means That Are conclusions and implications appropriately developed and clearly linked to the nature and content of the research framework and findings? T F.
Q220 Able to communicate well within the international research community Means That Are conclusions and implications appropriately developed and clearly linked to the nature and content of the research framework and findings? T F.
Q221 Quality of the work as a whole Means That Is the literary quality and general presentation of the thesis of a suitably high standard? T F.
Q222 Original contribution Means That Does the thesis as a whole constitute a substantive original contribution to knowledge in the subject area with which it deals? T F.
Q223 At Honors level Means That It is a work of original research of approximately 10-000 words in length (It is typically produced within a year alongside the demands of coursework.) T F.
Q224 At the Masters degree level - minor thesis Means That Itis with length limits ranging from 10-000 to 25-000 words. It is completed within one or two years alongside coursework T F.
Q225 At the Masters degree level - Masters by research Means That Itis with length limits ranging from 10-000 to 25-000 words. It is completed within one or two years alongside coursework T F.
Q226 Doctor of Philosophy level Means That It is about 30-000 to 40-000 words. It is much more substantial than those that are written by coursework students as it is the result of full-time research over one to two years. This thesis is examined by experts in the field outside the department. T F.
Q227 Look at Other Theses where Means That If you were an examiner. With the guidelines for examiners in front of you- begin the assessment of each of them by first looking at the overall layout. T F.
Q228 The first step of checking Other Theses Means That If the table of contents gives you a clear idea of the structure of the work as a whole. T F.
Q229 The second step of checking Other Theses Means That If the table of contents gives you a clear idea of the structure of the work as a whole. T F.
Q230 The third step of checking Other Theses Means That Read the introduction carefully and compare it to the conclusions to see if the work is linked in a coherent manner T F.
Q231 Look especially for specific formatting and conventions Means That Professional layouts- innovative displays of complex material in graphs or tables- or a strong integration of online materials. T F.
Q232 Examinations are not necessarily to hand out criticism- or even praise- but Means That Professional layouts- innovative displays of complex material in graphs or tables- or a strong integration of online materials. T F.
Q233 It is not to explain how you spent your time- or to describe the hypotheses that ultimately didn’t make sense - but Means That To sharpen a study T F.
Q234 You need to structure your thesis in such a way Means That that you take the reader from the aim to the conclusions- via the evidence and arguments- in the clearest possible way. T F.
Q235 Introduction - Background - Core- and a synthesis Means That that you take the reader from the aim to the conclusions- via the evidence and arguments- in the clearest possible way. T F.
Q236 IT explains what the thesis is about: The problem that the thesis is concerned with- the aims and scope- and the thesis structure. In some disciplines it includes an overview of the findings. It may use illustrative examples to help underpin the reader’s understanding of what you are trying to achieve. (Tell the reader the problem you are tackling in this project) Means That The introduction T F.
Q237 It is the knowledge required before a reader can understand your research: relevant history- context- current knowledge- theory and practice- and other researchers’ views. (How it affects the questions you can ask) Means That The introduction T F.
Q238 It concerns your own work: Your propositions or hypothesesinnovations- experimental designs- surveys and reviews- resultsanalysis- and so on. The core can easily form the bulk of the thesis and consist of several chapters. (Contribution - test your hypotheses or answer your questions- and why you chose them) Means That The core T F.
Q239 It draws together your contribution to the topic. It will usually contain a discussion in which you critically examine your own results in the light of the previous state of the subject as outlined in the background- and make judgments as to what has been learnt in your work; the discussion may be a separate chapter- or may be integrated with the detailed work in the core. (Pull the whole thesis together) Means That The core T F.
Q240 It that takes the reader along the road should be as straightforward as you can make it Means That The story- or narrative T F.
Q241 The problem and its significance; relationship to previous work; derivation of hypotheses; design of experiments; results; analysis and interpretations; conclusions Means That The story- or narrative T F.
Q242 Non-standard Thesis Structures - interdisciplinary Means That the structure might be T F.
Q243 Non-standard Thesis Structures - Blending Means That In-depth examination of the context and history of a situation before arriving at a statement of the problem. T F.
Q244 Maintainin consistency of style and presentation over 50-000 words or more. It a problem where and when Means That In-depth examination of the context and history of a situation before arriving at a statement of the problem. T F.
Q245 Some tools might include an editor for Means That Entering and modifying text; spelling and grammar checkers; a bibliography database; a line-art environment; and a system for laying out the text in a form suitable for printing or for viewing online. T F.
Q246 The style of a document to be separated from its content Means That Entering and modifying text; spelling and grammar checkers; a bibliography database; a line-art environment; and a system for laying out the text in a form suitable for printing or for viewing online. T F.
Q247 It is one way that examiners assess your readiness to enter the community of scholars. If you are sloppy- or maintain incomplete lists- or perhaps fail to cite a work- it signals that are you not respecting colleagues Means That Presentation T F.
Q248 You shouldn’t put references in your list of references Means That Presentation T F.
Q249 Avoiding deep structures Means That Unless you have cited them T F.
Q250 Writing Tools - First problems is Means That Is to have paragraphs with numbers like 3.1.2.1a T F.
Q251 Writing Tools - second problems is Means That It is names (people’s names or place names)- and words for which there are alternative spellings. T F.
Q252 Writing Tools - third problems is Means That Grammar-checkers (plural subjects must not have singular verbs) T F.
Q253 The standard References (Harvard style) must have Means That The title of the article- the journal name- year of publication- and publisher and place- together with an optional abstract and keywords. T F.
Q254 If you are using charts generated by a spreadsheet program or a statistical package- these too can be imported into your text. If you want to plot your data- enter into such a package rather than attempting to create a graph with a line art tool Means That Tables and Figures T F.
Q255 See what you have done- and later decide whether to accept or reject your decisions Means That Tables and Figures T F.
Q256 That is- explicit storage of drafts and tracking changes as the work progresses Means That Tracking Changes T F.
Q257 Do not see that no benefit in writing well Means That Version management T F.
Q258 Writing Style Means That Writing Style T F.
Q259 If you can cut a sentence into parts without destroying the meaning or tone- do so. Means That Carpet-bag sentences. T F.
Q260 Thesis and Things to avoid Means That Carpet-bag sentences T F.
Q261 To remove the presence of the writer from the text- scientists resorted to use of the passive voice Means That Don not use homespun phrasing- and folksy metaphors T F.
Q262 Rely on the context to indicate whether something happened in the past- is happening now- or may happen in the future. Means That Verb Tenses T F.
Q263 Use the past tense when you are Means That Reporting what you or others did at particular T F.
Q264 When you are in an introduction to a chapter or section or a table where you are outlining its contents Means That Use the present tense T F.
Q265 Use the present tense when you are Means That discussing the implications of some work of yours or others T F.
Q266 Use the future tense when Means That discussing the implications of some work of yours or others T F.
Q267 They should be used after transitional words such as howevernevertheless- moreover- therefore- and similarly. Means That Reporting the implications of your or other work T F.
Q268 The main use is to separate parts of a sentence that are too closely related to be broken into separate sentences. Means That Punctuation - Commas T F.
Q269 The have a sense of introducing something that is to follow: a list Means That Punctuation -Colons T F.
Q270 They are different- and each has its own specific uses. one is used to build up complex words. Means That Punctuation -Colons T F.
Q271 Avoid them! They are annoying Means That Punctuation -Dashes and hyphens T F.
Q272 If the meaning is still clear with a lowercase initial (and the word isn’t a proper noun). Means That Punctuation -Exclamations T F.
Q273 Have quite separate uses - Don’t use them nterchangeably Means That Punctuation - Brackets Curved brackets (parentheses)- and square brackets T F.
Q274 It is to enclose the exact words of a writer or speaker Means That Punctuation -Quotations T F.
Q275 Is to indicate the logic flow in a passage of text (conjunctionstransitional ) Means That Punctuation -Quotations T F.
Q276 They will be condemned for using jargon. Means That Link words T F.
Q277 as regards- in regard to’- in terms of - in relation -rather than Means That Repair words T F.
Q278 They might establish the context of an item in the main text- or give the derivation of an equation. Means That Repair words T F.
Q279 It is a fundamental issue of academic honesty and instances of it can provoke strong responses. Means That Plagiarism T F.
Q280 Draftthesis structure with chapters- sections- and subsections. Whenever something occurred - add a new section and a few lines of text to describe what you thought you should say. Means That Plagiarism T F.
Q281 it is a weak model because it brings two risks. One is that the writing is likely to be less Polished Means That Research first and write later T F.
Q282 It is a model that enabled you to resolve the tension between your rational- conscious thinking and creative- unconscious thinking. Means That Research first and write later T F.
Q283 Is you good enough to finish a thesis if you couldn’t start! Means That Research and write together T F.
Q284 I asked you to list the key areas you are interested in. Within a few minutes- you have to list five topic areas. Means That Next- I’ll ask you to circle the ones that you is particularly interested in. T F.
Q285 When you have finished writing for the day- save what you have written. Then go to bed- and sleep on it Means That Allow the creative side of your brain to work T F.
Q286 You would sit at your desk and type a single word- stare at it for a while- then Means That Type another- and then maybe delete the whole sentence and begin again. T F.
Q287 The recommend strategy is to find the gateways Means That It is a paper or book or other source you discover through actively exploring Gateways lead to paths. T F.
Q288 The recommend strategy is to find the paths Means That It is a paper or book or other source you discover through actively exploring Gateways lead to paths. T F.
Q289 Respecting a supervisor and thinking independently. Means That They must be Tbalanced T F.
Q290 The have stories of bull-headed students Means That They must be Tbalanced T F.
Q291 The Introductory Chapter MUST answer some uestion Like Means That Where are you from - How did you get here - What are you doing here - What type of person are you - What have you done so far - and where are you going T F.
Q292 They are crucial- and it speaks for you as you strive to join an international community of scholars. Means That Introductions T F.
Q293 For Example- your readers may feel as if they have entered a conversation that has already started without them. Means That Establishing a Context T F.
Q294 The style of writing reflects Means That The style of discipline area. T F.
Q295 The best way to determine an appropriate style Means That The style of discipline area. T F.
Q296 If you’ve situated your work- your next task is to motivate further interest in the area—typically by Means That Stating the problem T F.
Q297 A brief history of the issue at hand - A recent increase of the issue - Dissatisfaction with current knowledge - An identification of specific set of factors. Means That Statement of the Problem or Motivation for the Study generally contains T F.
Q298 The first line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study Means That Statement of the Problem or Motivation for the Study generally contains T F.
Q299 The second line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study Means That It may advance knowledge in the applicable field T F.
Q300 The third line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study Means That It may demonstrate a novel use of a procedure or technique T F.
Q301 The fourth line of argument that may be used to establish the significance of a study Means That it may advance knowledge in the applicable field T F.
Q302 You have to make a general statement of the research questions or a hypothesis in Means That First chapter T F.
Q303 It would provide the basis for the design of your own work- which then could be understood in context- located within a theoretical framework- and conducted using techniques backed with solid justification Means That First chapter T F.
Q304 The first common elements in the background chapters is Means That Establishment of a context to locate a study in time- locationor culture T F.
Q305 The second common elements in the background chapters is Means That Identification of current theory- discoveries- and debatesincluding an evaluation of those most useful and salient to your topic T F.
Q306 The third common elements in the background chapters is Means That Identification of current theory- discoveries- and debatesincluding an evaluation of those most useful and salient to your topic T F.
Q307 The fourth common elements in the background chapters is Means That Understanding of current practices and technologies in your field that highlight T F.
Q308 The first purpose of review of current theory serve in Means That Preliminary investigations done by you or others to help clarify research techniques- formulate hypotheses T F.
Q309 The second purpose of review of current theory serve in Means That Giving the background information required to contextualize the extent and significance of your research problem. T F.
Q310 The third purpose of review of current theory serve in Means That Providing examples of methods they have employed in attempts to get these solutions. T F.
Q311 For me- The first phase of reading a piece of research literature is. Means That I try to get a sense of what the researchers were trying to do and whether the problem is genuinely interesting T F.
Q312 For me- The second phase of reading a piece of research literature is. Means That I try to understand how they undertook the work. T F.
Q313 For me- The third phase of reading a piece of research literature is. Means That I try to understand how they undertook the work. T F.
Q314 You have to determine what to omit- and what to establish in your context Means That Don’t include material that the reader does not need in order to understand what will follow. T F.
Q315 You have to determine what to omit- and what to establish in your context Means That Include anything that is genuinely clarifying. T F.
Q316 It requires a certain amount of mental gymnastics Means That Include anything that is genuinely clarifying. T F.
Q317 The second section of your review Means That Engaging in a conversation with other academics T F.
Q318 The third section of background material Means That Examining the approaches and techniques others used in research in your topic area. T F.
Q319 When you have finished your own research it is time to rewrite the background chapters Means That Revising T F.
Q320 You . . . . who went before you. Means That Revising T F.
Q321 You now know what . . . . . - perhaps unconsciously- about your study area. These can now be made explicit. Means That Understand the links between your own work and the work of others T F.
Q322 You are aware of the issues . . . . . in your field- and have explicitly pointed out their limitations. Means That Assumptions you made T F.
Q323 You may have realized (perhaps with the help of . . . . in your research seminars) that you were making unwarranted assumptions about the level of knowledge of other people about the backgroundto your own work. Means That Feedback from your supervisors and participants T F.
Q324 Ensure that the ways that you are going to use . . . . are carefully defined. Means That Feedback from your supervisors and participants T F.
Q325 It is as a convenient label to cover a wide variety of alternative kinds of structure and content; and also that- in some respects- the whole thesis is a it- from your novel analysis of the background literature to your approach to interpretation of results. Means That Contribution T F.
Q326 It is the process of restructuring existing computer code—changing the factoring without changing its external behavior. Means That Contribution T F.
Q327 Design . . . for . . . Means That Suggested templates T F.
Q328 Eexplicit representation of data and control dependencies in . . . field (PipeGraph by Tarek Aly) Means That Program Dependence Graph: T F.
Q329 Representation of procedure calls between . . . (PipeGraph by Tarek Aly) Means That System Dependence Graph T F.
Q330 Reverse engineers the initial state to understand existing . . . application dependencies Means That System Dependence Graph T F.
Q331 A Forcing code to access the field with getter and setter methods Means That Software intelligence T F.
Q332 Creating more general types to allow for more code sharing for xxxxx Means That Generalize . . . type T F.
Q333 It is the action or process of carefully watching someone or something. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Observation T F.
Q334 It is a new thing or a new method of doing something. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Observation T F.
Q335 It is to spend time learning about a particular subject Means That Kinds of Contribution - Innovation T F.
Q336 It is a written account that gives detailed information about a person- group- or thing and their development over a period of time. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Study T F.
Q337 It is based on or uses the ideas and abstract principles that relate to a particular subject- rather than the practical aspects or uses of it. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Theoretical study or explanation T F.
Q338 It is aspects of something involve real situations and events- rather than just ideas and theories. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Theoretical study or explanation T F.
Q339 It involves numbers and calculations. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Practical T F.
Q340 It is a study relies on practical experience rather than theories. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Empirical T F.
Q341 It is you approved because it has strong moral principles (Philosophical). Means That Kinds of Contribution - Principled T F.
Q342 It is a way of dealing with something is based on practical considerations- rather than theoretical ones. A pragmatic person deals with things in a practical way. Means That Kinds of Contribution - Principled T F.
Q343 They propose a description of observed phenomena and then proceed to evaluate whether the description is valid. Means That It is based on observation T F.
Q344 They involve creation of something new as well as evaluation of it. Means That It is based on innovation T F.
Q345 A particular phenomenon can be studied in its own right or to provide information on a broad range of similar phenomena Means That case study T F.
Q346 They are ways of testing hypotheses or answering questions or evaluating innovations. Means That case study T F.
Q347 It is the branch of knowledge that deals with method and its application in a particular field of study. Means That Methods T F.
Q348 The term is derived by analogy from surveying- where precise measurement of something involves observing it from multiple angles or locations- and also ensuring that the measurements are consistent with each other. Means That Methodology T F.
Q349 It concerned with the practice of research- or- in the terms of developing the research questions and hypotheses and designing experiments- instruments- and processes for testing these hypotheses. Means That Triangulation T F.
Q350 Research Methods Means That Research Methods T F.
Q351 This may flow directly from the background material Means That That -this is what I am doing - and - this is how I am going to investigate it T F.
Q352 This may involve- say- your building a case that your new approach solves problems that previous approaches neglected. Means That For an innovation-based thesis T F.
Q353 This may persuade the reader that the subject is of sufficient interest Means That For an innovation-based thesis T F.
Q354 This may persuade the reader that the subject is representative of a broader population. Means That For a study-based thesis T F.
Q355 Identify the processes that enabled you to reach these insights Means That For a case study-base thesis T F.
Q356 Print out your thesis every now and again Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q357 It demonstrates an ability to communicate research findings effectively in the professional arena and in an international context. Means That Document and Version Management T F.
Q358 The first component of a thesis that can be viewed is Means That The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. T F.
Q359 The second component of a thesis that can be viewed is Means That How the data was gathered and what it is intended to represent T F.
Q360 The third component of a thesis that can be viewed is Means That What the gathered data looks like; T F.
Q361 At this stage of the research- you will have analyzed and interpreted your results- and now you need to use them to present an argument to the reader. Means That How it should be interpreted. T F.
Q362 An examiner won’t trust your results unless they understand that your data is Means That Fair T F.
Q363 Make an effort- too- to understand the process of submission (guidelines for the examiners) and examination. Means That Fair T F.
Q364 You need to get into the habit of thinking and working (Your chosen field). Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q365 The thesis demonstrates authority in the candidate’s field and shows evidence of command of knowledge in relevant fields. Means That Making a Strong Start T F.
Q366 From Data to Results Means That Linking the data to your original goal T F.
Q367 Interpretation of the analyses is Means That Linking the data to your original goal T F.
Q368 No piece of research is really . . . . and the reader will appreciate your views on where the work could be extended. Means That Completing a transformation from data to knowledge T F.
Q369 Some were always keen to move on to the next . . . before the current one was complete Means That Complete T F.
Q370 They might be a straightforward case of carelessness- haste- and overconfidence—and a lack of willingness to listen to criticism—leading Means That Difficulties T F.
Q371 Two key concepts in every aspect of managing data and presenting results Means That Difficulties T F.
Q372 Variables determine the behaviour of the Means That Which are variables (or parameters) and category T F.
Q373 Make sure you have a single location- maybe that USB drive Means That Document and Version Management T F.
Q374 When you use it to test hypothesis Means That Data becomes information T F.
Q375 When you use an the argument or chain of reasoning to draw conclusions from it Means That Information becomes knowledge T F.
Q376 When it is integrated into your whole way of looking at things. Means That Information becomes knowledge T F.
Q377 They are the outcomes of research. They represent our most certain comprehension of the universe Means That Knowledge becomes wisdom T F.
Q378 They are unconfirmed supposition. Means That Hypothesises T F.
Q379 Use logical names for the thesis components. Means That Document and Version Management T F.
Q380 Proportion TP / (FP + TP) Means That Precision Score T F.
Q381 Sensitivity or the true positive rate Recall Score = TP / (FN + TP) Means That Recall Score T F.
Q382 Ratio Accuracy Score (TP + TN)/ (TP + FN + TN + FP) Means That Model accuracy T F.
Q383 Equal weight function to both the Precision and recall 2* Precision Score * Recall Score/ (Precision Score + Recall Score) Means That Model accuracy T F.
Q384 It is representing predictions vs Actuals on Test Data Means That Confusion Matrix T F.
Q385 It measures the extent to which the model correctly predicts the positive class. Means That True Positive (TP) T F.
Q386 It occurs when the model predicts that an instance belongs to a class that it actually does not. Means That False Positive (FP) T F.
Q387 Create whole directories with complete versions of the thesis. Means That False Positive (FP) T F.
Q388 It is the outcomes that the model correctly predicts as negative. Means That True Negative (TN) T F.
Q389 It occurs when a model predicts an instance as negative when it is actually positive. Means That False Negative (FN) T F.
Q390 In a binary classification problem with classes -A- and -B-- if our goal is to predict class -A- correctly- then a true positive would be the number of instances of class -A- that our model correctly predicted as class -A-. Means That False Negative (FN) T F.
Q391 If a medical diagnosis model has a high false positive rate- it may result in patients undergoing unnecessary treatment. Means That True Positive (TP) Example T F.
Q392 If the model is predicting whether or not a person has a disease- a true negative would be when the model predicts that the person does not have the disease and they actually don’t have the disease. Means That True Negative (TN) Example T F.
Q393 If a cancer screening test predicts that a patient does not have cancer when they actually do- this could lead to the disease progressing without treatment. Means That True Negative (TN) Example T F.
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